Grassroots at the Gateway: Class Politics & Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis, 1936-75

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Breaking new ground in the field of Black Freedom Studies, Grassroots at the Gateway reveals how urban black working-class communities, cultures, and institutions propelled the major African American social movements in the period between the Great Depression and the end of the Great Society. Using the city of St. Louis in the border state of Missouri as a case study, author Clarence Lang undermines the notion that a unified "black community" engaged in the push for equality, justice, and respect. Instead, black social movements of the working class were distinct from—and at times in conflict with—those of the middle class.



This richly researched book delves into African American oral histories, records of activist individuals and organizations, archives of the black advocacy press, and even the records of the St. Louis' economic power brokers whom local black freedom fighters challenged. Grassroots at the Gateway charts the development of this race-class divide, offering an uncommon reading of not only the civil rights movement but also the emergence and consolidation of a black working class.

About the Author

Clarence Lang is Assistant Professor in African American Studies and History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Product Specifications

Published by the University of Michigan Press, paperback, 2009. 344 pages. 11 illustrations.