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Fred Geary: Missouri Master of the Woodcut

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Fred Geary: Missouri Master of the Woodcut
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This catalog provides the most complete overview of Geary’s career ever published. It reproduces sixty-five examples of his prints arranged thematically. Catalog entries provide basic information about the artwork, and short essays discuss relevant aesthetic and historical issues. The entries also include the publication and exhibition history of each print when available.

Description

Details

Born in Clarence, and reared in Carrollton, Missouri, Fred Geary worked as a commercial artist for nearly thirty years at the Fred Harvey Company in Kansas City and was celebrated as a woodcut artist.

The State Historical Society of Missouri holds the largest collection of his original prints in the nation.

This catalog provides the most complete overview of Geary’s career ever published. It reproduces sixty-five examples of his prints arranged thematically. Catalog entries provide basic information about the artwork, and short essays discuss relevant aesthetic and historical issues. The entries also include the publication and exhibition history of each print when available.

About the Editors

A native Missourian, Joan Stack received her Ph.D. in art history from Washington University in St. Louis. She spent five years as curator of European and American art at the University of Missouri's Museum of Art and Archaeology before joining the SHSMO staff as curator of art collections in 2006. Her research interests include George Caleb Bingham, Thomas Hart Benton, and the study of material culture's role in shaping historical memory.

Jean Ann Ferguson received a B.A. in Classical Languages from the University of Missouri – Columbia and a M.A. in Secondary Education from the University of Missouri – Kansas City. She taught Latin for over twenty years, and began researching Fred Geary at the State Historical Society in 2002.

Product Specifications

Published by the State Historical Society of Missouri, 2012. 152 pages. 68 illustrations.